Boom Shakalaka
egobus:

Brave is a very emotional movie for Clint  

egobus:

Brave is a very emotional movie for Clint  

stevencrewniverse:

From Supervising Director Ian Jones-Quartey:

STEVEN UNIVERSE PANEL AT WONDERCON ANAHEIM

Join us @ 12:30 TOMORROW in Anaheim, CA for Wondercon! See Rebecca Sugar! Meet The Crewniverse! And get a glimpse of things to come! 

bruitist:

Some of the best background stuff from Ms Marvel (taken from Ms Marvel #1 and #2, and All-New Marvel Now! Point One).

Art by Adrian Alphona.

I’m a spy. Not some rooftop-jumping archer, shield-wielding super soldier, or shiny-metal philanthrobot. 

wheelr:

"There are too many people, including professionals, who think it’s okay to condescend, harass, berate, etc. women in comics simply because they’ve espoused a belief that revolves around women being treated more as equals. I want women and girls to be seen as an equally promising demographic for comics as males; I want major companies with an easy opportunity to reach out to women to not feature art that is disgusting and objectifying; I want women to be hired as much as men to create comics; I want to not know so many people who have been violated in an industry I still love despite it all."

Janelle Asselin

"You need to help lower the price of women doing business in comics and in comics fandom to only the hard work. Not the hard work plus ducking threats online and off of violence, dodging groping, inappropriate advances, joking at the expense of the fat girl, the not “hot” girl, picking up and carrying around the short girl, creepshotting the cosplayer, stalking the professional.

"You know, sexism. Violence. Attacks intended to create doubt and fear."

Lea Hernandez

"People should be allowed to express a dissenting opinion on the internet without being threatened with rape; people should be allowed to have consensual sex without being labeled a whore; people should be allowed to wear whatever they want without being groped or demeaned; people should be allowed to express themselves in ways that do not conform to narrow, antiquated definitions of ‘gender’ without being disrespected or physically attacked. And come on, people. This is obvious stuff."

— Ali Colluccio

"This is not women’s problem. This is MEN’S PROBLEM. I know most internet trolls are teenaged boys who don’t know any better, but this is MAN’S THING. This is something you men need to figure out and condemn and deal with. There should be MAN RULES about it, like how you’re not supposed to go into the urinal next to another guy, that kind of thing. Belittling, embarrassing, threatening and shaming women should not be some kind of masculine rite of passage. It should be the opposite of being a real man."

Heidi MacDonald

"The problem we’re discussing in our industry is symptomatic of a larger issue. Specifically, we are living in a world that perpetuates and upholds the sub-human treatment of women. And that discrimination — the patriarchal idea that women are not fully human, that we are objects, commodities, property — trickles down and down, into every facet of our lives."

Marjorie Liu

"You may say, ‘I’ve never seen someone make a rape threat online,’ but can you say the same about a rape joke, or a man telling a women she’s being ‘too emotional’ or ‘she needs to get laid?’ My guess is no. And guess what? That’s where it starts. Making someones’ gender an attack point.

"You see it. You know you do. Next time, say something."

— Jill Pantozzi

phrrmp:

She-ra by nna
gailsimone:


the preeminent gail simone of our time

One’s too many and a hundred ain’t enough.

gailsimone:

the preeminent gail simone of our time

One’s too many and a hundred ain’t enough.

lezbhonest:

by MyishaAshanta
kalidraws:

You guys have all heard of Lumberjanes by now, right?  I’m happy to say that my exclusive cover for Lumberjanes #1 is for sale at Challengers Comics in Chicago (my hometown!) coinciding with Noelle's signing there this past weekend. I think the whole Lumberjanes crew is ace and I'm excited to have contributed to such a girl-positive comics series, drawn and written by awesome ladies!
I’ve been watching a lot of River Monsters and I really liked the idea of setting the Lumberjanes off on a canoeing adventure with an unexpected catch. I’ve since been informed that the canoe I drew totally looks like a vagina. It was unintentional, but I’m more than ok with that! By ladies for ladies, amirite??

kalidraws:

You guys have all heard of Lumberjanes by now, right?
I’m happy to say that my exclusive cover for Lumberjanes #1 is for sale at Challengers Comics in Chicago (my hometown!) coinciding with Noelle's signing there this past weekend. I think the whole Lumberjanes crew is ace and I'm excited to have contributed to such a girl-positive comics series, drawn and written by awesome ladies!

I’ve been watching a lot of River Monsters and I really liked the idea of setting the Lumberjanes off on a canoeing adventure with an unexpected catch. I’ve since been informed that the canoe I drew totally looks like a vagina. It was unintentional, but I’m more than ok with that! By ladies for ladies, amirite??

Friend: So how do you think you've changed since high school?
Me: Well I became aware of oppressive power structures and how we are complicit in them and now seek to dismantle them.
Friend: ...
Me: I also think I got hotter.
I twittered about this earlier, but sometimes it feels as though talking about misogyny in this industry is like dealing with Groundhog Day: there seems to be a continuous reset, a collective male amnesia around the issue. As if, when a woman speaks out, it’s for the first time and everyone is shocked. Just shocked, I tell you. Sexism exists? OH MY GOD.
Veteran writer Marjorie Liu on sexual harassment/misogny in the comics industry—and the collective amnesia that hits much of the industry every time the topic ever gets broached. (via robot6)

But the Euro-American feminists, being part of the dominant culture, deal with [Latina] women - and other racial/ethnic women - differently from the way they deal with each other. They take for granted that feminism in the USA is THEIR garden, and therefore they will decide what manner of work racial/ethnic women will do there.

By the time I began to experience all this, I had learned much about the dynamics of oppression and prejudice and I could understand what was going on. However, what took me totally by surprise was the inability or unwillingness of the Euro-American feminists to acknowledge their prejudice.

Most feminists ‘believe that because they are feminists, they cannot be racists.’ Euro-American feminists, like all liberals, sooner or later, have come to the point at which they are willing to ‘acknowledge that racism exists, reluctantly of course, but nobody admits to being a racist.’

While whitewashing - pun intended - their personal sins of racism/ethnic prejudice in the restful waters of guilt, they continue to control access to power within the movement. Euro-American feminists need to understand that as long as they refuse to recognize that oppressive power-over is an intrinsic element of their racism/ethnic prejudice, they will continue to do violence to feminism.

Ada María Isasi-Díaz, “A Hispanic Garden in a Foreign Land,” Mujerista Theology. (via lo-cotidiano)
madeleineishere:

on the way to work this morning

madeleineishere:

on the way to work this morning

alittlebitofartandcrap:

Storm by Vitor Cafaggi

alittlebitofartandcrap:

Storm by Vitor Cafaggi